EDUCATION AMPLIFIER

The Education Amplifier program provides an opportunity for community-rooted engagement by bringing Amplifier’s art as well as lesson plans and resources to drive social justice conversations in classrooms across the United States. Over 2,600 teachers are registered for the program, and teachers are located in every state in the U.S. and all over the globe.

On September 18th 2018 we launched our non-partisan art campaign, We the Future. We The Future are images of ten young leaders representing ten diverse movements, each carrying the hopes of their generation, each already building us a better world.

America’s children are growing up in a time of unprecedented fear, misinformation, and division. Students spend an average of 1,200 hours a year in school, and today what they see—or don’t see—on their classroom walls matters more than ever.

With your help, we plan to cover at least TWENTY THOUSAND of those walls with new icons:

We invite you to join Amplifier in our campaign to support these young leaders, as they draft and pass new legislation, fight for voting rights, and lead efforts on criminal justice reform, immigration rights, gun violence prevention, disability justice, queer and trans rights, literacy, youth voter mobilization, and climate justice.

Register for the 2018-2019 Education Amplifier program to receive free We The Future artwork and accompanying teaching tools to guide discussions of social justice and paths to action in your classrooms. Teachers interested in participating should register below.

Where Education Amplifiers are Teaching

Register to be an Education Amplifier!

Register for free to become an Education Amplifier, bringing art, dialogue, and cross-cultural understanding into your classroom.

  • Free art downloads, and opportunities to receive physical art packs to help decorate your classroom for educators teaching in the U.S.
  • Access to the digital Education Amplifier classroom, with lesson plans, teaching tools, and templates to use in your classroom.
  • Monthly teaching tools for middle and high school classrooms built in collaboration with youth leaders, their nonprofits, and a network of thousands of educators.
  • Opportunity for your students to participate in the We The Future Op-Ed Open Call, essays about their visions of the future, exclusive to Education Amplifier cohort classrooms.
  • Connect to a national network of educators working to empower and develop the next generation of American leaders.
  • Learn how to bring art, dialogue, and cross-cultural understanding into your classroom by participating in our free Education Amplifier online course.

Featured Resources

Q&A

Why is it important to bring dialogue regarding American identity into K-12 classrooms?

The most crucial conversations that will shape the future of America aren’t happening in the Capitol, but rather in our classrooms. Educators are informing, developing, and empowering the leaders of tomorrow.

The images represented in Amplifier campaigns serve as a reminder of how our unique individual backgrounds help to create our collective identity. Appreciation and understanding of uncommon ground is even more important than the finding of common ground. These conversations in the classroom can help to promote an inclusive classroom and school culture, challenge the rising levels of intolerance and bigotry being perpetuated in the media and on school campuses, and empower the leaders of tomorrow to build an equitable society.

What is the We the Future campaign?

We the Future showcases ten young leaders representing ten diverse movements, each already building us a better world. They are drafting and passing legislation. They are working on climate justice, criminal justice reform, voting rights, immigration rights, disability justice, gun reform, queer rights, and literacy. Their work is nonpartisan, and it carries the energy of countless communities from every background. In a time of uncertainty, these icons show us a path forward, and they show us that the Future is already here.

In partnership with the artists Shepard Fairey, Rommy Torrico, Munk One, and Kate DeCiccio, this project will place art and supporting teaching tools representing these young leaders and their movements into more than 20,000 schools across the country, to inspire and engage the next generation. Learn more here.

How do I talk about this program with student’s family members, colleagues, and administrators?

The Education Amplifier program, and Amplifier itself, are nonpartisan. None of the art or campaigns promote a specific ideological or political belief system to students. These critical conversations have been taught and promoted by both conservatives and liberals, and engage students not in a debate over politics, but instead in dialogue around human rights, respect, dignity, and resiliency.

How can I have dialogue around identity and social justice with my students and maintain a space of respect in my classroom?

To create a brave space for all students to share and learn, you can co-create a list of norms with your students that will maintain a space of respect and provide opportunities to hold each other accountable. A “brave space” is an environment where students accept and celebrate difference, assume the best intentions of each other, and accept responsibility of affecting the emotional well-being of another person. You can use our “Creating a Brave Space” guide to help establish respectful norms in your classroom.

How can I frame these conversations without making it political?

Allow students the opportunity to come up with their own conclusions about what our individual identities look like and how our differences could create a collective American identity. One of the cornerstones of American democracy is our freedom to question, criticize, and form our own opinions. Modeling this in a classroom means asking open-ended questions that pertain to the subject matter without interjecting your own opinions.

I have a lesson plan that I would like to share with other teachers in the cohort. How can I share that with them?

We would love to include your lesson plan as a resource in our digital classroom on Edmodo, and help you share it with the rest of the cohort. Once you register, you’ll receive login information to join our digital classroom. You’ll be able to share any tools, ideas, news, or questions through the digital Education Amplifier classroom on Edmodo.

I teach outside of the U.S. Can I still get free artwork shipped to my classroom?

The first 20,000 U.S. based educators who register for the Education Amplifier program will receive free artwork and accompanying teaching tools as well as access to our digital Education Amplifier classroom on Edmodo. Educators who teach outside of the U.S. can register to access our digital Education Amplifier classroom and download the artwork for free from our website. Free digital downloads of all We The Future artwork become available at Amplifier.org on October 15, along with teaching tools, ideas for how to take action, and interviews with the ten icons and their organizations.

Will I receive continued support from Amplifier throughout the school year and what will that look like?
  • Free art downloads, and opportunities to receive physical art packs to help decorate your classroom for educators teaching in the U.S.
  • Access to the digital Education Amplifier classroom, with lesson plans, teaching tools, and templates to use in your classroom.
  • Monthly teaching tools for middle and high school classrooms built in collaboration with youth leaders, their nonprofits, and a network of thousands of educators.
  • Opportunity for your students to participate in the We The Future Op-Ed Open Call, essays about their visions of the future, exclusive to Education Amplifier cohort classrooms.
  • Connect to a national network of educators working to empower and develop the next generation of American leaders.
  • Learn how to bring art, dialogue, and cross-cultural understanding into your classroom by participating in our free Education Amplifier online course.
When will lesson plans be available?

The 2018/2019 Education Amplifier program begins in November. After the shipment of free artwork, educators will receive the first lesson plan for the program year. Educators will receive teaching tools that accompany the We the Future artwork developed in collaboration with the ten youth leaders, their nonprofits, and a network of thousands of educators every month during the 2018/2019 school year. They will be sent directly to your inbox.

What age are the lesson plans created for?

The resources being shared are accessible and adaptable for any educator in middle and high school (grades 6 through 12). Educators in any grade level are invited to participate in the Education Amplifier program. We will be distributing these conversation drivers to our entire network of educators. The lesson plans will focus on the icons and the social change movement they represent. The lesson plans are an opportunity for students to learn more about the brilliant work each of our icons are doing as well as to join in on the national conversation around each issue areas.

Tools & Resources

The following lesson plans and resources have been recommended by Education Amplifiers as tools to help teachers bring dialogue around identity, rights, and civics into their classrooms. If you would like to recommend a tool for Amplifier to spotlight, please email our Program Coordinator Maribel Gonzalez at [email protected].

Democracy Class

CREATED BY: Rock the Vote

DESCRIPTION: Lesson plan that uses video, group discussion, and a mock election activity to teach students the skills and information they need to navigate the elections process and participate as citizens. The lesson plan includes registering students to vote.

GRADE LEVEL(S): Grades 9-12

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:

  • Grades 9-10:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.A
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.B
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.C
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.6
  • Grades 11-12:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.A
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.B
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.C
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.6

KEYWORDS: democracy, multi-media, elections, voting, civics, rights, citizenship

It’s Not So Black and White: Discussing Race and Racism in the Classroom

CREATED BY: Scholastic & Dr. Beverly Tatum

DESCRIPTION: Dr. Beverly Tatum shares advice on how to effectively facilitate conversations about race relations in the United States in the classroom.

GRADE LEVEL(S): Grades K-8

COMMON CORE STANDARDS: *Not a lesson plan

KEYWORDS: race, racism, facilitation, advice, conversation, race relations, equality, independence, slavery

Beyond Pink and Blue: The Impact of Gender Stereotypes

CREATED BY: The Advocates for Human Rights

DESCRIPTION: Students will explore gender, gender norms, and the impact of stereotypes in this lesson plan.  Students will think critically about how gender norms influence fiction, and research gender stereotypes in the media.

GRADE LEVEL(S): Grades 3-7

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:

  • Grade 3:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.4
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.3.7
  • Grade 4:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.7
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.4
  • Grade 5:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.7
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.4
  • Grade 6:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.7
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.6.6
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.9
  • Grade 7:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.6
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.7
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.7.9

KEYWORDS: gender, gender norms, stereotypes, media, fairy tales, film, television, women, men, women’s rights

Free to Believe

CREATED BY: Teaching Tolerance  

DESCRIPTION: This lesson plan explores different religions in the United States, and promotes an understanding of religious tolerance and diversity.  Students will understand freedom of religion and examine their own actions when someone believes differently than they do. Students will identify ways that they can be more accepting of different belief systems.

 

GRADE LEVEL(S): Grades 3-5

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:

  • Grade 3:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1
  • Grade 4:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.1
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1
  • Grade 5:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1

KEYWORDS: religion, understanding, tolerance, diversity, freedom, freedom of religion, actions, beliefs, acceptance

Your Rights as a CitizenCREATED BY: Brain Pop

DESCRIPTION: In this lesson plan, students use BrainPOP resources to explore their rights as citizens. Students will explain what a democracy is by examining its advantages and disadvantages. Students will make inferences about what America would be like without democracy.

GRADE LEVEL(S): Grades 3-5

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:

  • Grade: 03
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.7
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.3.8
  • Grade: 04
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.7
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.8
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.9
  • Grade: 05
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.7
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.8
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.9

KEYWORDS: democracy, civics, history, problem-solving, rights, citizenship

City of Immigrants

CREATED BY: Brain Pop

DESCRIPTION: In this lesson plan, students will explore documented experiences of immigrants in early 20th Century America. Students will use critical thinking skills to understand the choices immigrants have had to make by understanding assimilation and survival in regards to American equality and liberty.

GRADE LEVEL(S): Grades 6-8, 9-12

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:

  • Grade: 05
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.10
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.3
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.6
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.5.2
  • Grade: 06
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.3
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.6.2
  • Grade: 07
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.3
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.7
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.7.2
  • Grade: 08
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.3
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.7
  • Grade: 09, 10
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.4
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.9-10.7
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3
  • Grade: 11-12
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.4
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.11-12.7
    CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.4

Real-World DemocracyCREATED BY: Study.com

DESCRIPTION: Introductory lesson for middle school students to learn about democracy. Students will compare how democracy is implemented in Greece, United Kingdom, and the United States.

GRADE LEVEL(S): Grades 6-8

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:  

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.  
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.

KEYWORDS: democracy, civics, Greece, United Kingdom

Basic Concepts of DemocracyCREATED BY: Youth Leadership

DESCRIPTION: This lesson plan teaches core concepts of American democracy such as majority rule, the equality of all persons, and the art of compromise. In addition, the lesson plan includes activity that encourages student discussion on responsibility in a democracy.

GRADE LEVEL(S): Grades 9-12

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:

  • Grades 9-10:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.C
  • Grades 11-12:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.C

Fundamentals of Representative Democracy

CREATED BY: National Conference of State Legislatures

DESCRIPTION: These lessons are designed to encourage an appreciation of representative democracy by students. Elements stressed are: disagreement among people, and among members of Congress and state legislators, and deliberation, negotiation, compromise and decision by those elected to represent their constituents.

GRADE LEVEL(S): Grades 9-12

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:

  • Grades 9-10:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.A
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.B
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.D
  • Grades 11-12:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.A
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.B
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.D

KEYWORDS: democracy, representative, representation, congress, legislation, compromise, constituents, decision making, negotiation

Create a Candidate

CREATED BY:

DESCRIPTION: Democracy and Me has put together lessons that help teach students about the fundamentals of democracy and the electoral process in the United States. In this lesson plan, students will learn about how democracy works by researching the stances on major policy issues held by political parties, debate the issues with classmates, and then, create a political candidate and campaign strategy.

GRADE LEVEL(S): Grades 6-8

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:

  • Grades 6:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.6.1
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.3
  • Grades 7:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.7.1
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.3
  • Grade 8:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.8.1
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.3

You’ve Got Issues

CREATED BY: Democracy and Me

DESCRIPTION: Teach students about the fundamentals of democracy and the electoral process in the United States. In this lesson plan, students will form teams to research an issue and argue the issue from either the Liberal/Democratic point of view or the conservative/Republican point of view. Students will apply the information in a debate in front of the class.

GRADE LEVEL(S): Grades 8, 9-12

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:

  • Grade 8:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.8.1
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.8.1.A
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.7
  • Grade 9-10:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.7
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1
  • Grade 11-12:
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.7
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1